Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorPeinado Abarrio, Rubén
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-04T12:04:40Z
dc.date.available2013-04-04T12:04:40Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.issn1578-3820
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10835/2072
dc.description.abstractThe controversy that followed hurricane Katrina and its representation by the media revealed unresolved racial issues in contemporary United States. Present-day New Orleans has become an ideal site for the application of Michael Omi and Howard Winant’s ‘racial formation’ theory, which challenges essentialist visions of race pointing to its sociohistorical construction. The present article makes use of this theoretical perspective to examine two pieces of fiction set in post-Katrina U.S.: HBO’s TV series Treme , and Richard Ford’s short-story “Leaving for Kenosha”. Such an analysis unveils key connections between race and class, ideology, politics or the role of the media. Keywords : Racial formation, Katrina, race, African Americans, mass media.es_ES
dc.language.isoenes_ES
dc.publisherUniversidad de Almería.es_ES
dc.sourceOdisea : Revista de Estudios Ingleses. Número 13, Enero-Diciembre 2012es_ES
dc.subjectRacial formationes_ES
dc.subjectKatrinaes_ES
dc.subjectRacees_ES
dc.subjectAfrican Americanses_ES
dc.subjectMass mediaes_ES
dc.subjectFormación raciales_ES
dc.subjectRazaes_ES
dc.subjectAfroamericanoses_ES
dc.subjectMedios de comunicaciónes_ES
dc.title'‘Like Refugees in their Own Country’: Racial Formation in post-Katrina U.S.”es_ES
dc.title.alternative“Como refugiados en su propio país”: La formación racial en Estados Unidos después del Katrina.es_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_ES
dc.relation.publisherversionhttp://www.ual.es/odisea/Odisea13_Peinado.pdfes_ES
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_ES
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.25115/odisea.v0i13.233


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record