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dc.contributor.advisorGómez López, Jesús Isaíases_ES
dc.contributor.authorRodríguez Pastor, Carolina
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-20T08:16:14Z
dc.date.available2015-05-20T08:16:14Z
dc.date.issued2015-05-20
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10835/3365
dc.description.abstractBrave New Worldand Nineteen Eighty-Fourare some of the best examples of dystopian novels in the twentieth century. Following the definition given by Gregory Claeys in his chapter, The origins of dystopia: Wells, Huxley and Orwell, 'dystopia' is often used interchangeably with 'anti-utopia' or 'negative utopia', by contrast to utopia or 'eutopia' (good place), to describe a fictional portrayal of a society in which evil, or negative social and political developments, have theupper hand, or as a satire of utopian aspirations which attempts to show up their fallacies. According to the distinction made by Jorge.es_ES
dc.language.isoenes_ES
dc.subjectTrabajo Fin de Máster de la Universidad de Almeríaes_ES
dc.subjectAldous Huxleyes_ES
dc.subjectGeorge Orwelles_ES
dc.titleBrainwashing constituents in Aldous Huxley's brave new worldand George Orwell's nineteen eighty-foures_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/doctoralThesises_ES
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_ES


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