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dc.contributor.authorMolero Jurado, María del Mar
dc.contributor.authorMartos Martínez, África
dc.contributor.authorBarragán Martín, Ana Belén
dc.contributor.authorSimón Márquez, María del Mar
dc.contributor.authorOropesa Ruiz, Nieves Fátima
dc.contributor.authorSisto, María
dc.contributor.authorPérez Fuentes, María del Carmen
dc.contributor.authorGázquez Linares, José Jesús
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-19T09:28:28Z
dc.date.available2021-04-19T09:28:28Z
dc.date.issued2021-04-06
dc.identifier.issn2254-9625
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10835/10501
dc.description.abstractThe prevalence of mobbing among nurses in various countries is around 17–20%. Some researchers have attempted to explain the success or failure of adaptation to the work environment and teamwork and to buffer the effects of psychological harassment in the workplace by incorporating emotional intelligence into the mobbing context. As its main objectives, this quantitative, observational, cross-sectional study analyzed the relationship between emotional intelligence and mobbing as perceived by nurses and sought to establish the mediating roles of other variables involved, such as social support and sensitivity to anxiety. The final sample consisted of 1357 Spanish, self-selected nurses aged 22–58 from multiple healthcare institutions. The questionnaires (Perceived Psychological Harassment Questionnaire, The Brief Emotional Intelligence Inventory, Brief Perceived Social Support Questionnaire, Anxiety Sensitivity Index-3) were implemented on a web platform, which enabled the participants to complete them online. Descriptive analyses and mediation models were estimated. Personal characteristics related to high sensitivity to anxiety and low emotional intelligence implied greater presence of mobbing at work. This mobbing may be buffered if the person perceives enough support from family, friends or significant others. Our results recommend reinforcing the social support network of nursing personnel to improve the work climate and training them in emotional intelligence in university and on-the-job programses_ES
dc.language.isoenes_ES
dc.publisherMDPIes_ES
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internacional*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectsocial supportes_ES
dc.subjectnursinges_ES
dc.subjectemotional intelligencees_ES
dc.subjectmobbinges_ES
dc.subjectsensitivity to anxietyes_ES
dc.titleEmotional Intelligence Profiles and Mobbing in Nursing: The Mediating Role of Social Support and Sensitivity to Anxietyes_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_ES
dc.relation.publisherversionhttps://www.mdpi.com/2254-9625/11/2/26es_ES
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_ES
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe11020026


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Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internacional
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internacional