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dc.contributor.authorCangas Díaz, Adolfo Javier
dc.contributor.authorSass, Louis
dc.contributor.authorPérez-Álvarez, Marino
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-29T07:12:35Z
dc.date.available2012-10-29T07:12:35Z
dc.date.issued2008-09
dc.identifier.other10.1353/ppp.0.0187
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10835/1760
dc.description.abstractThe life of Saint Teresa of Jesus, the most famous mystic of sixteenth-century Spain, was characterized by recurrent visions and states of ecstasy. In this paper, we examine social components related to Teresa’s personal crises and the historical conditions of her times, factors that must be taken into account to understand these unusual forms of experience and behavior. Many of these factors (e.g., increasing individualism and reflexivity) are precursors of the condition of modern times. Indeed, certain parallels can be observed between Saint Teresa and certain present-day psychopathological disorders. The analogy should not, however, be carried too far. Religion played a particularly crucial role in Teresa’s cultural context; as a result, it would be misleading to view her mystical experiences as resulting from a mental disorder.es_ES
dc.language.isoenes_ES
dc.titleFrom the Visions of Saint Teresa of Jesus to the Voices of Schizophreniaes_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_ES
dc.relation.publisherversionhttp://muse.jhu.edu/journals/ppp/summary/v015/15.3.cangas.htmles_ES
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_ES


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