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dc.contributor.authorTorres Núñez, Juan José 
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-22T19:46:27Z
dc.date.available2012-02-22T19:46:27Z
dc.date.issued2001
dc.identifier.issn1578-3820
dc.identifier.issn2174-1611
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10835/1007
dc.description.abstractThis article discusses the rejection of Falstaff comparing Act 5, scene 5 of 2 Henry IV, with Act 1, scene 2 of 1 Henry IV. The rejection is inevitable because Falstaff represents disorder. His triumph would mean the victory of anarchy over order, stability and justice. But we become so involved with him that we even tolerate his conspiracies. He is clever, funny and one of the most fascinating characters in English literature. The two plays show the Prince as a good student of Machiavelli; we could consider them as a practical guide to instruct the Prince in his road to power.es_ES
dc.language.isoenes_ES
dc.publisherUniversidad de Almeríaes_ES
dc.sourceOdisea : Revista de Estudios Ingleses. Número 01, Enero-Diciembre 2001es_ES
dc.subjectFalstaffes_ES
dc.subjectShakespeare, William (1564-1616)es_ES
dc.subjectCrítica literariaes_ES
dc.titleThe Rejection of Falstaff.es_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_ES
dc.relation.publisherversionhttp://www.ual.es/odisea/Odisea01_TorresN.pdfes_ES
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_ES
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.25115/odisea.v0i1.9


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