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dc.contributor.authorFernández Maldonado, Francisco Javier 
dc.contributor.authorGallego Granados, Juan Ramón 
dc.contributor.authorValencia, Alicia
dc.contributor.authorGámez Cámara, Manuel Angel 
dc.contributor.authorVarga, Zoltan 
dc.contributor.authorGaray, József 
dc.contributor.authorCabello García, Tomás 
dc.date.accessioned2024-04-16T11:37:04Z
dc.date.available2024-04-16T11:37:04Z
dc.date.issued2017-05-20
dc.identifier.citationFernández-Maldonado, F.J.; Gallego, J.R.; Valencia, A.; Gámez, M.; Varga, Z.; Garay, J.; Cabello, T. (2017). Cannibalism: Do risks of fighting and reprisal reduce predatory rates? Community Ecologya, 18: 87-96.es_ES
dc.identifier.issn1585-8553
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10835/16377
dc.description.abstractCannibalism is a common phenomenon among insects. It has raised considerable interest both from a theoretical perspective and because of its importance in population dynamics in natural ecosystems. It could also play an important role from an applied perspective, especially when using predatory species in biological control programmes. The present paper aims to study the cannibalistic behaviour of Nabis pseudoferus Remane and the functional response of adult females. In a non-choice experiment, adult females showed clear acceptance of immature conspecifics as prey, with relatively high mortality values (51.89 ± 2.69%). These values were lower than those occurring for heterospecific prey, Spodoptera exigua Hübner, under the same conditions (80.00 ± 2.82%). However, the main result was that the rate of predation on heterospecific prey was reduced to 59.09 ± 7.08% in the presence of conspecific prey. The prey-capture behaviour of adult females differed when they hunted conspecific versus heterospecific prey. This was shown in the average handling time, which was 23.3 ± 3.3 min in the first case (conspecific) versus 16.6 ± 2.5 min in the second (heterospecific). Furthermore, the values increased in the former case and declined in the latter according to the order in which the prey were captured. The difference in handling time was not significant when adjusting the adult female functional response to conspecific nymphs. We argue that these results likely indicate risk aversion and a fear of reprisal among conspecifics.es_ES
dc.language.isoenes_ES
dc.publisherAkaémiai Kiadó, Budapestes_ES
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internacional*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectEcologyes_ES
dc.subjectInsectses_ES
dc.subjectPredatory specieses_ES
dc.subjectNabis pseudoferuses_ES
dc.subjectSpodoptera exiguaes_ES
dc.titleCannibalism: Do risks of fighting and reprisal reduce predatory rates?es_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_ES
dc.relation.publisherversionhttps://plantsys.elte.hu/pdf/garay/Fernandez-Maldonado-2017-CommEcol.pdfes_ES
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_ES
dc.identifier.doi10.1556/168.2017.18.1.10


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