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dc.contributor.authorLópez Ramírez, Manuela
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-04T12:13:51Z
dc.date.available2013-04-04T12:13:51Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.issn1578-3820
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10835/2078
dc.description.abstractThrough Sula (the main character of Toni Morrison’s eponymous novel), Morrison reinterprets the concept of the Dark Lady of the traditional Gothic romance. She is a demonic female, who de fies the Law of the Father in her search for identity. As the embodiment of subversion, she becomes the “village witch”, the symbolic expression of the African community’s confrontation with evil. In fact, through Sula, Morrison reflects intensively on evil. The demonic female comes to be a scapegoat, the target of the black community’s social frustrations. Sula is a modern Dark Lady with a radical power of self-creation and self-af firmation.es_ES
dc.language.isoenes_ES
dc.publisherUniversidad de Almería.es_ES
dc.sourceOdisea : Revista de Estudios Ingleses. Número 13, Enero-Diciembre 2012es_ES
dc.subjectDark Ladyes_ES
dc.subjectGothices_ES
dc.subjectTransggresiones_ES
dc.subjectBlack communityes_ES
dc.subjectEviles_ES
dc.subjectPatriarchales_ES
dc.subjectMujer oscuraes_ES
dc.subjectGóticoes_ES
dc.subjectTrasgresiónes_ES
dc.subjectComunidad negraes_ES
dc.subjectMales_ES
dc.subjectPatriarcales_ES
dc.titleSula, a dark lady.es_ES
dc.title.alternativeSula, una mujer oscura.es_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_ES
dc.relation.publisherversionhttp://www.ual.es/odisea/Odisea13_Lopez.pdfes_ES
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_ES
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.25115/odisea.v0i13.228


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